Londoner. Books are the love of my life. Tea is practically my religion.

About Me: music taste, twitter, etc. I am mainly on twitter so HI ADD ME

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I also run Fuck Yeah Girls In Bow Ties.

Previously known as: EwaTheCat
Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
Reblogged from k-spencers  500 notes

Fears are fears. Slay your demons when you’re awake, they won’t be there to get you when you sleep. You can’t afford to be weak. Down here, weakness is death, fear is death.

Reblogged from explore-blog  469 notes

On a day like today, my master William Faulkner said, “I decline to accept the end of man.” I would fall unworthy of standing in this place that was his, if I were not fully aware that the colossal tragedy he refused to recognize thirty-two years ago is now, for the first time since the beginning of humanity, nothing more than a simple scientific possibility. Faced with this awesome reality that must have seemed a mere utopia through all of human time, we, the inventors of tales, who will believe anything, feel entitled to believe that it is not yet too late to engage in the creation of the opposite utopia. A new and sweeping utopia of life, where no one will be able to decide for others how they die, where love will prove true and happiness be possible, and where the races condemned to one hundred years of solitude will have, at last and forever, a second opportunity on earth. By In the wake of Gabriel García Márquez’s death, wisdom from his 1982 Nobel Prize acceptance speech. Complement with Faulkner’s iconic 1950 Nobel speech on the role o the writer as a booster of the human heart, which Márquez bows to here. (via explore-blog)

Reblogged from rhube  622 notes
rhube:

headbeater:

“We are more than a bit concerned with the Benihana egg trick called for in the script. I’ve tried it and can only get it 1 out of 4 tries, and I’ve seen Benihana chefs flub the manoeuver when they have an entire grill as target. Mads has to crack his eggs into a 8-inch diameter skillet. The props Master calls his guy. The Production Manager calls in his guy. I call my guy. On the morning of the shoot we have 8 dozen eggs and 3 Japanese chefs with their hands made up to be hand doubles.
I guess I don’t have to tell you that when Mads arrives on set, I briefly describe the egg trick to him whereupon he just tosses an egg up in the air and breaks it perfectly on the spatula. Did it. Unbelievable. I insist it was a lucky fluke but he does it again. I accuse him of practicing when I wasn’t looking but he laughs (as if he has time to practise egg-cracking between scenes) and confesses he was a juggler in his youth.”

Ahahahahaha, Perfection. I honestly had assumed they either did a million takes or had a chef do it. But, of course.

rhube:

headbeater:

“We are more than a bit concerned with the Benihana egg trick called for in the script. I’ve tried it and can only get it 1 out of 4 tries, and I’ve seen Benihana chefs flub the manoeuver when they have an entire grill as target. Mads has to crack his eggs into a 8-inch diameter skillet. The props Master calls his guy. The Production Manager calls in his guy. I call my guy. On the morning of the shoot we have 8 dozen eggs and 3 Japanese chefs with their hands made up to be hand doubles.

I guess I don’t have to tell you that when Mads arrives on set, I briefly describe the egg trick to him whereupon he just tosses an egg up in the air and breaks it perfectly on the spatula. Did it. Unbelievable. I insist it was a lucky fluke but he does it again. I accuse him of practicing when I wasn’t looking but he laughs (as if he has time to practise egg-cracking between scenes) and confesses he was a juggler in his youth.”

Ahahahahaha, Perfection. I honestly had assumed they either did a million takes or had a chef do it. But, of course.

Reblogged from kadrey  13,578 notes

I’ve never been female. But I have been black my whole life. I can perhaps offer some insight from that perspective. There are many similar social issues related to access to equal opportunity that we find in the black community, as well as the community of women in a white male dominate society…

When I look at — throughout my life — I’ve known that I wanted to do astrophysics since I was 9 years old…I got to see how the world around me reacted to my expressions of these ambitions. All I can say is, the fact that I wanted to be a scientist, an astrophysicist was hands down the path of most resistance through the forces of society.

Anytime I expressed this interest, teachers would say, ‘Oh, don’t you wanna be an athlete?’ I want to become someone that was outside of the paradigm of expectations of the people in power. Fortunately, my depth of interest of the universe was so deep and so fuel enriched that everyone of these curve balls that I was thrown, and fences built in front of me, and hills that I had to climb, I just reach for more fuel, and I just kept going.

Now, here I am, one of the most visible scientists in the land, and I wanna look behind me and say, ‘Where are the others who might have been this,’ and they’re not there! …I happened to survive and others did not simply because of forces of society that prevented it at every turn. At every turn.

…My life experience tells me that when you don’t find blacks, when you don’t find women in the sciences, I know that these forces are real, and I had to survive them in order to get where I am today.

So before we start talking about genetic differences, you gotta come up with a system where there’s equal opportunity, then we can have that conversation.

By Neil DeGrasse Tyson in response to a question posed by Lawrence Summers, former Treasury Security and Harvard University President (via geardrops)

Reblogged from rhube  27 notes

Always remember that once upon a time, an eighteen year old girl sat down to start writing and basically created a genre. By

Kristen Gunther on the wonder that is Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein.

(via girlcanon)

Except Margaret Cavendish invented science fiction, and it’s really, really important that we not ignore the achievements of one woman in favour of another, especially if we’re tempted by a more appealing narrative of the young girl who sparked something great.

Frankenstein received more attention than The Blazing World, and therefore inspired more people. But that 18 year old girl was writing in a more supportive environment (even if still one fraught with problems). There are reasons why we remember this woman and not the other.

Read more about this in my post ‘Remembering Margaret Cavendish’. Or in Specualtive Fiction 2012, where it was reprinted.

(via rhube)